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  1. #1
    Would you approve of such a thing if it reduced crime significantly?

  2. #2
    Anne Brown
    Guest
    only if they don't allow any insurance companies to have any access at all to the information.

  3. #3
    Anne Brown
    Guest
    and it is built up over time during investigations rather than everyone give a sample today

  4. #4
    Not sure. It's a great idea, but the whole infringement of personal freedom/big brother thing is worrying. It's not like the politicians can actually be trusted not to misuse info at some stage.

  5. #5
    Anne Brown
    Guest
    That's primarily what worries me. The obvious use I can think of is health insurance but I dare say there is more uses that would infringe on our lifestyles.

  6. #6
    More Gears Than Sense
    Guest
    To be honest would it reduce crime? Its another arguement for the state to control us, look at all the cameras in town centres, British Citizens are caught on state cameras more than any other country in the world. But does it help crime?Boston in the US has no cameras but a huge Police Presence and the crime rate is low.Leeds, has a big camera presence and practically no police presence, the crime rate is higher.Are Cameras, DNA databases just a way for the government to keep an eye on all of us?

  7. #7
    Anne Brown
    Guest
    Good point, I would say a DNA database wouldn't help reduce crime but help solve crimes faster.Nothing but a good police presence will help reduce crime. Or at least move it into a new more hidden field.

  8. #8
    SloBoy - Fitter, happier, more productive
    Guest
    I would have though a complete DNA database would act as a crime deterrent for quite a wide range of personal and property crime.Wouldn't help so much with fraud, maybe.Would I mind ? Probably not.The insurance question is an interesting one - generally, currently, insurance companies are allowed to take account of medical history, incuding perhaps conditions that have manifested themselves but which are genetically.In some cases, they also choose not to (particular popular with old dear" insurance with no medical - they make it a selling point).But for some individuals it would of course make insurance cheaper, so not sure if there's a black and white difference from today, there."

  9. #9
    A small thing is a good thing
    Guest
    the old dear insurance with no medical is actually a crap savings plan - they just want you to invest your money and you dont need to take a medical when you open a post office savings account either.The rules on not being allowed to genetic profiles by insurance companies is set to expire in a couple of years. Considering the way the nhs is being dismatled (foundation hospitals, private clinics with nhs staff etc) its only a matter of time before we are all reliant on private insurance to provide our healthcare. Woe betide you if you have genetes that suggest you could be prone to certain conditions.

  10. #10
    Paul (not riding at all) Cooper
    Guest
    I think the DNA idea is helps solve crimes, people become easier to catch less repeat convictions as they get wise to the fact. Trouble is it doesnt solve the cause of crime aspect does it. No specific reason for distrusting the idea but I suppose the analysis of genetics for insurance purposes would be of concern.

  11. #11
    SloBoy - Fitter, happier, more productive
    Guest
    You mean we should be Tough on Crime, Tough on the Causes of Crime ?Hey, that could catch on !

  12. #12
    Senior Member
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    Jul 2004
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    I don't agree with the idea at all. Firstly there was never any compulsory fingerprinting of innocent people, so why start it with DNA.Secondly, I just don't trust the police or home office scientists - lets say that your dna got found at a crime site by some process other than you being the culprit, if they've got your dna you will be latched on to, and if the cops want the evidence, the scientists will rustle something up, wheter its a minute gunpowder particle or whatever.I would never voluntarily hand over dna to the cops, unless i thought it was to specifically clear me from direct suspicion - in the case of a mass screening, I would try to refuse also.

  13. #13
    Anne Brown
    Guest
    nobody mentioned compulsory

  14. #14
    Senior Member
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    your not likely to get criminals registering themselves voluntarily. Does that then raise the issue that not wanting to register is suspicious?

  15. #15
    Richard Herberth
    Guest
    I was burgled last weekend and the police who drove round to my flat (from across the road) ordered the forensics team around -this happens in all burglaries i think.They found nothing, absolutely no good prints because most household surfaces are unsuitable for preserving them. They had worn gloves i was told. Had they stopped to smoke a cigarette or drink any drinks in my bedroom i was asked? I don't think so, as I was blissfully watching England beat Macedonia in the living room at the time. Its all well and good having a DNA database, but it takes too much time and effort (and money) for them to bother with sophisticated DNA analysis to catch a burglar. When I was burgled at christmas last year (different flat), the CCTV was ineffectual because the little scrote was wearing a baseball cap (while riding off on my Kona)...My point is that these ideas can be dressed up to sound great for catching scumbags and placating the voting public, but in reality its for another reason. DNA detection and fingerprinting all have their place, but only for serious crimes...otherwise the police won't bother - its too expensive and time consuming. Can you imagine them analysing hairs and flakes of skin from my carpet - i don't think so.So tackle the causes of crime because measures like this don't stop burglars or theives of any kind. As i have seen, the most basic precautions make them impossible to catch in this way. And I resent the fact that I might have to give anything personal to the government/police - its none of their bloody business.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
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    i would not worry me to give a sample it might not be used to help catch thieves and minor crimes but if i helped put just one kiddie fiddler behind bars then i must be a good thing

  17. #17
    A small thing is a good thing
    Guest
    just out of interest how does dna database help in identifying nonces?

  18. #18
    Senior Member Combat Wombat's Avatar
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    [CynicalBigBrotherMode]The database is being built as fast as people are being born.All babies born leave their umbilicle cords at the Hospital, do you think they go in the bin?[/CynicalBigBrotherMode]

  19. #19
    Senior Member
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    i dont mean theres something in a kiddie fiddlers dna that identifys them as being that its just an example of a major crime

  20. #20
    Senior Member
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    nonces have identical dna to crabs, although there's no scientific evidence of this, its a fact.(as spoken by dr fox on Brass Eye)

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