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  1. #41
    Senior Member MrD's Avatar
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    Currently being at a uni that was traditionally a teacher training institution and still pushes a lot into teaching I decided the PGCE wasn't for me. I did consider going lower primary, 'catch them before they go bad' and all that. Surprisingly most men from my background go that route. Primary schooling is getting sorted out quite well, secondary is still lagging behind.

    But ultimately there are two glaring issues that prevent this route:

    1) The government meddling with the curriculum. Forever changing it, causing red tape and planning nightmares for teachers.

    2) 91% of my institutions teacher trainees are in work 6 months after graduation. If you look at the figure for 12 months after it's dire. 50% of my institutions students (all courses) are in work 12 months after graduation. Then we get to teachers - nationally, only 8% of qualified teachers are in a permanent, full time job as a teacher in a school (post graduation you must qualify by spending 12 months in a school, so that accounts for the surveying results for the first year.)

    Have you considered TESOL? An Englishman with a degree can get work abroad fairly easily, although there are pitfalls with dodgy private schools, visas, lower wages. The 1200 CELTA course is a guaranteed career move. Go get 5 years in and come back and take the DELTA or even an MA in TESOL and move into bureaucracy, running the schools out there if your face fits. Get a nice house with a swimming pool in a hot country, a liveable wage, respect. Avoid 20 years of recession......

  2. #42
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrD View Post
    Have you considered TESCO?.
    .

  3. #43
    Senior Member Neil Helks's Avatar
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    Smile

    Not quite the same thing but I lectured at colledge for a year and hated every minute of it , the students have most of the power and they know it , even worse at secondary school I should think .

    You've all got it wrong , Hans is Trims troll .

    How did that smiley get up there .
    Last edited by Neil Helks; 02-03-12 at 19:28. Reason: computer illiteracy

  4. #44
    Senior Member Dirty Karlos's Avatar
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    You were a lecturer at a colledge?
    Wtf is a colledge?

  5. #45
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty Karlos View Post
    You were a lecturer at a colledge?
    Wtf is a colledge?
    Lots of pieces of paper stuck together to form an image of the person you most like to knock off.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Neil Helks's Avatar
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    Oops , I lectured in catering not English language .

  7. #47
    Senior Member Dirty Karlos's Avatar
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    No fucking shit.

  8. #48
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    I hear ya! Could get very messy...

  9. #49
    I'm sort of wondering if the replies to this thread were designed to test if I can separate naughty squabbling children...
    I'm going to get some proper advice from the head of English at a nearby Secondary tomorrow night, as she happens to be my mates girlfiend.
    I'm pretty serious about it - even if its shit, it'll be different shit from the brutal corporate rat race. 300 people made redundant at my firm this week, I was forced to lose one of my team - pure cost cutting to satisfy the city.

  10. #50
    Senior Member Alx's Avatar
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    It's a difficult one to advise on Tim. It all depends on what area of teaching you decide to go into, where you work, the makeup of the area, the quality of the Headteacher etc.
    I used to love teaching and to an extent still do, however the crap that goes with it has increased so much over the last few years that I'm personally questioning my future in teaching. This could however, just be more specific to my current role, leadership and makeup of my class which in my field (special ed) can vary enormously every year.

    My advice is to talk to as many teachers as you can, get some days in volunteering and think carefully about the type of teaching you want to do. At it's best teaching is creative, rewarding and inspiring. At it's worst it's frustrating, stressful and demoralising.

    Bit of a short reply and I could've gone on about the running down of the profession, the real term pay cuts and destruction of the pensions but that would only get the daily mail readers in a spin

    If you want to know any more then pm me your number and we can have a chat.

  11. #51
    Senior Member Sniper's Avatar
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    I'm sure we all have thoughts about career changes when it's all going tits up! When its going well, its the last thing on our minds, but a change of events, a downturn in the economy, a loss of stabilty would make most of us reconsider our careers.

    Trouble is, unless you're quite young, you're going back to square 1, competing with people younger than you, probably earning less and there's no guarantees that you'll be any happier in 5 or 10 years time.

    Its a bit like the people who decided to go to Spain and open a bar, hoping their lives would suddenly change dramatically......only to find that all of the issues that forced the move had followed them to their new life! Not trying to put you off Tim, but just adding a cautionary note to consider.

    Unfortunately no one ever said life was easy and we have to deal with the ups and downs along the way as best as we can.

  12. #52
    Alx thanks, good points - when I'm a bit further down the road I might take your offer of picking your brains! - I'm going to visit a teacher training careers fair this weekend and get some more detailed information, thren pick the brains of a couple of tame teachers I know over the next couple of weeks.
    Sniper - everything you say is fair comment. I have taken most of it into consideration already, including a temporary if extreme backward step in family income. However I'm going to be working for another 25 years, and this is a case of me paying the long game.
    My problem is that I'm trapped in a job that does not interest me that pays really quite well, but has little long term security part of the job involves training on IT systems - Teaching History would mean that at least 1 person in the room might be interested in the content which would be 1 more than now !
    Geography is another factor, where I live and want to continue living is a job desert, teaching could provide a stable income without a massive commute, I can see myself preparing a lesson plan a lot more easily than I see myself bringing more of the current job home...

  13. #53
    Senior Member Sniper's Avatar
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    I think teaching can be massively rewarding if you find yourself in the right situation, but probably massively awful if you are unfortunate enough to find yourself in the wrong situation.

    I recently spent a day in my (11 yr old) daughters classroom helping with an Art and craft project. I was quite honoured that I was one of two parents considered up to the job by their children and found the whole day very uplifting. In comparision with what I normally do, it was a breath of fresh air!

    But perhaps a couple of years on, would I find the drawbacks and downsides changing my feelings? Probably!

  14. #54
    Senior Member Dirty Karlos's Avatar
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    Trouble is, unless you're quite young, you're going back to square 1, competing with people younger than you, probably earning less and there's no guarantees that you'll be any happier in 5 or 10 years time.

    Its a bit like the people who decided to go to Spain and open a bar, hoping their lives would suddenly change dramatically......only to find that all of the issues that forced the move had followed them to their new life! Not trying to put you off Tim, but just adding a cautionary note to consider.


    All fair points as discussed. However if you're really unhappy and can't or don't want to picture yourself in the same position in 25 years time, with lots of regrets, you have to try surely?

    I've put everything into the last four years, studying for a degree and volunteering, learning new skills, whilst working full time in my current job, because I do not want to be sat in front of a PC till retirement. All my passions and interest lie outdoors.
    Okay I'm 38 and there are plenty of young uns out there with the same qualifications, but employers don't always want wet behind the ears graduates, with no life experience. If you're keen and enthusiastic go for it, worse case scenario you go back to what you were doing before, but at least you'll have tried.

    I'd just also like to say that I want for nothing, I have everything that anyone in the western world could need, but is it fulfilling? it it bollocks. There's more to life and doing something that you enjoy day in day out is an ideal, but doing something you don't even like or hate is just stupid.

  15. #55
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    I can't remember if he has family committments. This makes a difference. I'm in a similar position at work but perhaps more bearable than Timmy described. Despite the lack of effort that might ne portrayed herein I seem to be highly valued for my skills. Its also a case of the better-the-devil-you-know. I can put in 50+ hours here but still work the system to get a ride or two in mid week.

    More importantly for my family's sake, I have lots of benefits (designed of course to keep me here) that's help the family massively if there were health, redundancy or an inability to work scenario. Case in hand, last year the wife needed MRI's & other tests - total cost 5k totally funded by my medical cover, and she got the best treatment possible.

    In my case then, its bearable becuase I don't have an alternate longing like Karlos, or perhaps as bad a case of the blues as Timmy, and I enjoy the fruits of my labor at least.

    So my point was - consider the family if there is one.

  16. #56
    Stan. Yes I have a family and there are two points. 1 they will be better served by me.as a husband and parent if I spend 8 hours a day in a job doing something that I perceive has value, rather than bored to death and de-motivated. I'm sure half the reason I push quite hard at the sport I do is so I can have an area of my life which challenges and rewards me, and flushed out the days crap.
    Second although I'm pretty good at my role the company I work for is not long term secure, a re structure or merger could easily see me down the road, and the chances of getting a job on similar money without a min 1h30 each way commute would be minimal. So even though we'd be looking at 18 months to 2 years of financial hardship I am actually playing the long game and thinking of our future.

  17. #57
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    Fair points Tim. I'm at a "transitional point" family wise where I need the steady income / protective benefits for a few years but I have it in mind to seek an alternative to aim for after that.

    I think what you doing is both brave and quite noble. As a parent I'd love to know that my kids teacher is one who wants to teach, and made a choice to do so rather than the "it's a job" type. I wish you every success.

  18. #58
    Off to a careers fair at the weekend to learn more about it and talk to those in the profession about the most financially sensible way to transition.

    Not going to be handing in my notice just yet, but I'm going to start getting the ducks in a row.

  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty Karlos View Post
    I'd just also like to say that I want for nothing, I have everything that anyone in the western world could need, but is it fulfilling? it it bollocks. There's more to life and doing something that you enjoy day in day out is an ideal, but doing something you don't even like or hate is just stupid.
    That's probably the most enlightened thing you've written on this forum so far.

    Didn't Lurbak actually follow these principles and now lives the dream... (?)

    Ed. Although it's actually quite contradictory in as much as you clearly do want for something, otherwise you wouldn't feel unfulfilled, no...?
    Last edited by Hans Frii; 07-03-12 at 21:03.

  20. #60
    Senior Member Dirty Karlos's Avatar
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    Ed. Although it's actually quite contradictory in as much as you clearly do want for something, otherwise you wouldn't feel unfulfilled, no...?

    Okay, in that case it should say I that I want for nothing materially, but yes, definitely unfulfilled in the work sense.

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