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  1. #1
    Super Moderator David Arthur's Avatar
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    RockShox Reverb dropper seatpost

    RockShox might have taken a while to jump on the bandwagon, but boy was the wait worth it. The company has put its considerable experience with suspension and sealing to great use in the Reverb. It provides 125mm (4.92in) of up/down adjustment and is actuated via a hydraulic handlebar mounted push button, either mounted separately to the bars or using SRAMís MatchMaker to attach it to the shifters. Read the full review here.

    Has anyone invested in a dropper seatpost yet?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    Not until I can get one the same weight as my current "normal" post, no.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator David Arthur's Avatar
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    Not sure if that'll be possible, do you think Stan? On an all-mountain sort of bike I don't think the weight is really a penalty. Obviously for XC riding it's a different matter.

    Might the benefits outweigh the extra weight however?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Arthur View Post
    Not sure if that'll be possible, do you think Stan? On an all-mountain sort of bike I don't think the weight is really a penalty. Obviously for XC riding it's a different matter.

    Might the benefits outweigh the extra weight however?
    I've never used one so I cant really comment, although I've ridden he same UK trails as fast as people who have one (without lowering my saddle) and therefore failed to see the advantage.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator David Arthur's Avatar
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    Depends who you're following Stan...

  6. #6
    Senior Member Dalesman 's Avatar
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    Dropper seat posts go back further than a few yaers, early 90's they were about. Spring kind o thing that sat between saddle and frame. Weight put it down spring put it up. Never did catch on.
    Now if some clever manufacturer put something in the frame that may be different.
    *Sits down and designs frame seat post dropper*

  7. #7
    Senior Member Dalesman 's Avatar
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    *done*
    Tight fitting Keyed lightweight seatpost to prevent rotation in frame.
    Spring in seat tube with a hydraulic *Thing* to stop it going down
    *Thing* electrial operated lockout
    Button on bars.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Neil Helks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan View Post
    Not until I can get one the same weight as my current "normal" post, no.
    But you happily take the weight penalty of front and rear suspension over rigid and disc brakes over vs for the performance benefit so why not with dropper posts ?

  9. #9
    Senior Member Mike S's Avatar
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    Dropper post = another skill compensator?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Neil Helks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike S View Post
    Dropper post = another skill compensator?
    Surely you mean lack of skill compensator . Anyway theres no skill that will compensate for a seatpost in your way when trying to move around on a bike while descending steep switchbacks.

    If it allows you to ride stuff that you otherwise would'nt ride then it will improve your riding experience which is surely what we are all after .
    Last edited by Neil Helks; 25-01-12 at 13:01.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Helks View Post
    If it allows you to ride stuff that you otherwise would'nt ride then it will improve your riding experience which is surely what we are all after .
    Ah - a different point though. But does it improve your riding experience on the stuff you normally /regularly ride? Thats the real question to the masses and the answer probably determines whether you'd buy one or not.

    In response to your other questions, I'd say forks over rigid and disks over rim brakes are a more significant performance enhancement than a dropper post, in my opinion. But I would'nt argue with te skills compensation bit.


    The only time I've been hit in the nuts by a saddle was last weekend, when my foot slipped off my road bike pedal as I was trying to clip in....

  12. #12
    Senior Member Sniper's Avatar
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    If it allows you to ride stuff that you otherwise would'nt ride then it will improve your riding experience which is surely what we are all after ..

    Ah - a different point though. But does it improve your riding experience on the stuff you normally /regularly ride? Thats the real question to the masses and the answer probably determines whether you'd buy one or not.

    Having had a Spesh Command seat post for 18months now......I can say that I'd hate not to have it. As soon as the hills start to steepen to the point where you want to stand on the pedals, the ability to move the saddle down is wonderful. When it gets really steep and undulating, (I used to feel totally top heavy and ungainly), and you drop it to its lowest level, the bike is transformed and I feel it can take on anything!

  13. #13
    Senior Member Dalesman 's Avatar
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    I occasionaly get hooked up on the rear of the saddle especialy wearing baggies.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Neil Helks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan View Post
    Ah - a different point though. But does it improve your riding experience on the stuff you normally /regularly ride? Thats the real question to the masses and the answer probably determines whether you'd buy one or not.

    In response to your other questions, I'd say forks over rigid and disks over rim brakes are a more significant performance enhancement than a dropper post, in my opinion. But I would'nt argue with te skills compensation bit.


    The only time I've been hit in the nuts by a saddle was last weekend, when my foot slipped off my road bike pedal as I was trying to clip in....
    Your response to my questions doesn't really answer them . I was not asking which has the biggest positive effect on your riding , just stating that you are prepared to accept a weight penalty for superior braking and suspension then why not for a dropper post that will also give you a performance benefit .
    I assume that you have ridden with a dropper post or are you making assumptions based on what you have read .
    Anyway wider riser bars are a lack of skills compensator but most folk are only too happy to use them instead of 500mm wide flats .
    Last edited by Neil Helks; 25-01-12 at 18:36.

  15. #15
    Senior Member oldnick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike S View Post
    Dropper post = another skill compensator?
    Ooh yes please

  16. #16
    Senior Member oldnick's Avatar
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    Thing is whilst I like to ride everything saddle-up, when I'm pushed to lower it I love the 'toy-bike' feel it gives your riding.

    I may yet invest in one for the hustler (not much point worrying about every gram with a bike like that).

    I presume they work better than the old spring things Dalesman mentioned, I had one of them and they were shoite.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Nobby's Avatar
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    I don't even have a QR seat collar and never felt the need to drop my seat - even in t'Alps.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Helks View Post
    Anyway wider riser bars are a lack of skills compensator but most folk are only too happy to use them instead of 500mm wide flats .
    Mine are 540mm flat EC70s. Does it still count if it's carbon...

  19. #19
    Senior Member Sniper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nobby View Post
    I don't even have a QR seat collar and never felt the need to drop my seat - even in t'Alps.
    You see I just don't get that, unless of course our bikes are sooo different in set up, that you are riding in a totally different position to me.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Mike S's Avatar
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    Are 500mm flats readily available from a reputable manufacturer?

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